ESP8266 Overclocking & Speedometer

A few days ago I posted the code for a(n almost unusable) version of Zork (or actually, the Zmachine) for the ESP8266.  It was (and is) really, really slow.  The main problem appears to be that it constantly re-writes the Zmachine stack back to SPIFFS which, in addition to causing the running-through-chest-deep-molasses effect, will also wear-out your flash in double-quick time.  The fix for this (obviously) is to shoehorn the whole thing into main memory (which is a work-in-progress), but while trying to squeeze enough performance out of the ESP8266 to make this early cut at least somewhat playable, I thought I’d take the easy option first and run the ESP at 160MHz instead of the default 80MHz.  I should warn you right now that as far as making Zork playable went, it was a total failure, but I was pleasantly surprised at just how easy the speed selection is when using PlatformIO.  I didn’t even have to sacrifice a chicken.

Here’s the simple incantation, which you just need to add to the bottom of your platformio.ini file in the project directory (the comment line is optional):-

; Set the ESP8266 clock frequency to 160MHz
board_f_cpu = 160000000L

…and then just recompile (and, because you’ve just made a change to the platformio.ini file, PlatformIO itself is smart enough to know that it needs to do a complete rebuild, not a partial).

That’s it …you’re done!


 

NOTE – You can also use the system call “system_update_cpu_freq()” to dynamically update the ESP8266 clock frequency from within the program itself, instead of using the platformio.ini “board_f_cpu” setting.  Using the system call will override the compile-time setting.

CODE – Ray Burnette’s adaptation of the Dhrystone test program is available from my repository in both static and dynamic versions.  The static version simply loops endlessly, reporting the performance of the current module (so effectively the compile-time clock setting from the platformio.ini file).  The dynamic version toggles the clock speed using the system_update_cpu_freq() system call on each iteration and displays the performance for whichever the current setting is.

 

 

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