ESP8266 GPS NTP Server in the making

Chris Liebman is my kind of maker.  His projects are interesting, practical and almost always have the words “work in progress” somewhere in the (usually brief) description.  I was led to the NTP-server project when following up on his (ESP8266-based) AnalogClock creation (a method of keeping el-cheapo analog clocks in perfect time, even across power outages and daylight-savings time changes, using an ESP8266 and NTP).

The NTP-server is another “work in progress” project, with very little information, Breadboard prototype NTP serverother than the code, available.  It does hit a couple of sweet spots for me, though:-  NTP from a GPS PPS (pulse-per-second) signal and being ESP based (although the breadboard picture shows an ESP32, rather than ESP8266).

Chris is using an Adafruit “Ultimate GPS Breakout” board to provide the PPS signal, as well as serial time and date information to the ESP (the GPS communicates with the ESP via the standard serial pins, while debug-terminal output goes to Serial1).

I have to admit that I haven’t managed to get Chris’ code to compile successfully, yet (you’ll need to download some of Chris’ modified versions of several required libraries to get even close), but this certainly looks like one to keep an eye on (and I’m wondering if a lead soldered to the ‘status’ LED on one of those cheap, USB, GPS dongles would work reliably as a PPS signal source in this case).

 

 

Advertisements

A neat toy (but not an ESP)

Here I go with yet another not-quite-ESP-related diversion, but one which the audience of this blog this should find interesting, I hope.

A couple of weeks back I bought a cheap USB GPS dongle from Amazon.

U-Blox USB GPS Dongle

It was amazingly cheap (the Yen equivalent of $8 U.S.) and I wasn’t expecting too much, but I have a yearning to get a local reference clock for NTP set up on my local network and I thought that, if nothing else, this would be a good starting point for fiddling around with GPS before paying for (and possibly breaking) something more expensive.USB GPS dongle, antenna side  I have to say that I’m really, really impressed with this little thing.  I’m sitting in a valley with major mountain ranges to both the east and west of me (~3,000m on each side), so I have a fairly narrow view of the sky, but this little unit acquires and holds nine satellites from inside the house and about 1.5m from the window.

The second thing I did (after verifying that the unit did actually work) was to rip the covers off to verify the make and model of the receiver chip and, as you can see from the photo above, the built-in antenna covers most of the board space on the top side of the PCB (the single, other component, top L/H side, is the green, status LED).

USB GPS dongle, component side

The component side has the U-Blox G7020-KT chip in the bottom,R/H corner.  Note that there’s no FDTI (or equivalent) chip, as the G7020 has a USB interface included.

There’s a back-up battery on the board to maintain memory contents between power cycles (which, it turns out, is critical for reasonable start-up times for GPS receivers).

Unlike another (non-GPS) dongle which I bought recently‡, this unit barely gets warm to the touch and there are no ventilation slots or holes in the plastic cover.

Anyway, for anyone else interested in playing with these beasties, here are some hints to get you started:-

  • The very first time you power on this unit, it will take up to 25-minutes to locate the satellites and lock on. Apart from a very brief flash of the green LED when you first connect it, it will appear to be dead. It’s not! Just leave it connected and it will download the data it needs (the “almanac”) from the satellites it can see and eventually the green LED will start flashing once per second to show that it is now operational.
  • After that initial connection, the unit will come to ready (green LED flashing) in only a few seconds the next time you power on. This is because it saves that initial data to internal memory (with battery back-up).
  • If, on that first power-up, you don’t see a green flashing LED after 30-minutes, it’s because the unit can’t get a decent signal. Move it as close as you can to a window, or if you have a laptop, take it outside. If that doesn’t work, grab a 1m or 2m USB extension cable from your local 100-Yen shop and move your GPS dongle as far away from the computer (and as close to a window) as you can.
  • If you’re using Windows, you can get the genuine Windows driver directly from the chip manufacturer’s web site:-        https://www.u-blox.com/ja/support      -or- https://www.u-blox.com/en/support
  • The chip inside this unit is the U-Blox G7020-KT.
  • If you’re using open-source, you will probably find that your OS correctly identifies the USB device as soon as you plug it in. The application you need (as already noted) is the GPS daemon, “gpsd”. When you install “gpsd” you’ll get some additional helper applications bundled in, such as the invaluable “gpsmon” and “gpspipe”, which allow you to view the GPS data in several formats.
  • The device which you use to connect to the USB dongle will be different between various OSes. OpenBSD and FreeBSD will see it as /dev/cuaU0. Linux will see it as /dev/ttyACM0 or /dev/USB0.
  • To run gpsd you should use the “-n” option (“no-wait” – don’t wait for a client to connect before handling GPS data) and the device. So something like this:- /usr/local/sbin/gpsd -n /dev/cuaU0
  • After starting gpsd you should be able to run gpsmon (just type “gpsmon”) and see data coming from the device.
  • If you want to run your GPS dongle as a local source for the NTP daemon, you still need to start “gpsd” (and it’s important to use that “-n” option in this case). The gpsd process will automatically populate shared memory segments, which the ntpd daemon can then read to get time information (you may have to check your OS for sysctl settings for PPS to get this working). There are notes in both the ntpd and gpsd manual pages on how to do this. So far I have only managed to get ntpd to use the GPS embedded time information, not PPS.

As you can see from the photos above, the board has most of the components (including the battery and the G7020-KT chip) on one side and the antenna on the other. The green LED is on the same side as the antenna, so when you position your USB dongle, you should always have the green LED facing –upwards-. If your USB forces it to be downwards (unusual) or sideways (fairly common), you might want to buy an adapter or extender cable to ensure that you can position it so that the antenna (and LED) are pointing upwards.

 

‡ – A generic, black SDR dongle, bought for the advertised “R820T” tuner chip and specifically for receiving 1090Mhz ADS-B traffic from aircraft flying overhead (see the previous post on “PlaneSpotter”).  Not only does this thing get hot, it -doesn’t- have an R820T tuner chip at all (they use a cheaper and completely useless NC00012 tuner, which has a frequency range which cuts off at 985Mhz, so it doesn’t even cover the ADS-B band).  If you want to play with SDR (and especially ADS-B), save your money and buy a NooElec “Mini 2+” bundle (directly from nooelec.com) instead.  It has an R820T2 tuner chip, plus a temperature controlled, 0.5PPM accuracy oscillator and comes with a “starter” antenna and a remote control unit (??? don’t ask me …I have no idea why!) for $21 U.S. + $5 postage to anywhere in the world.