Sonoff-TASMOTA Updates

Theo has (as usual) been very busy with TASMOTA and has pushed out two releases in the last couple of weeks.  The first, at the very end of October (the “Halloween-een” 5.9.0 release) was a fairly massive update, with portions of the code being updated to follow Google’s C++ style guide as well as rewrites of some of the code to use command look-up tables and JavaScript.  In addition to those, there are seventy-odd other fixes, changes and additions.  Phew!  A couple of the notable items are:-

  • Addition of support for the Arilux AL-LC01 RGB LED controller.
  • Addition of support for the Magic Home RGBW LED controller.
  • Addition of support for the KMC 70011 Power Monitoring Smart Plug.
  • Addition of support for the VEML6070 I2C Ultra Violet sensor.
  • Addition of support for ‘inverted’ PWM.
  • Addition of support for the Luani HVIO (230v dual power control) board.
  • Addition of sea-level pressure calculation and a new ‘altitude’ command.
  • Addition of support for up to 8 relays (possible new product hint?).
  • Fixes for timezone and southern hemisphere STD/DST times.
  • Fix for a large flash erase issue.
  • Fix for ‘all-off’ issue when SaveState is inactive.
  • Fix for a pressure calculation issue with some BMP sensors.

…and lots more (check out the _releasenotes.ino file in the sonoff directory for the full listing).

The second release, 5.9.1, on the 7th of Nov, doesn’t have quite so many updates, but does add functionality to make addition of external sensors even easier and also adds support for the ADS1115 I2C AtoD chip, which a lot of people are going to find very useful.

That’s just a short round-up (I have no idea where Theo gets the time to do all of this magic …he must type at the speed of light) and, as already mentioned above, there are a lot more changes and fixes in there, so I’d recommend that you stroll over to GitHub and pull the latest version (it’s almost guaranteed to have even newer additions by the time you get there).

 

 

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Sonoff-TASMOTA Updated to 5.8.0

Theo has just released version 5.8.0 of the Sonoff-TASMOTA package into the wild, with a fairly varied collection of additions, updates and fixes.

There are several changes related to WS2812 LED control, a fix for a watchdog timeout problem, as well as other fixes for MQTT, language support and Domoticz and addition of support for the Yunshan Wifi Relay and Witty Cloud.  The complete changelog is available here:- https://github.com/arendst/Sonoff-Tasmota/blob/master/sonoff/_releasenotes.ino.

Owen Duffy has a nice rundown on the pros and cons of the Yunshan WiFi Relay board on his blog (and it’s worth taking a look at some of his other ESP stuff, too).

An interesting new Sonoff (ITEAD) product on the way

Browsing through the wiki pages on the ITEAD site is always a good way to pass a few idle minutes and usually rewards the curious reader with interesting stuff (like schematics, for instance) which ITEAD are kind enough to publish for our edification.  Sonoff 433MHz to WiFi bridge, block diagramToday’s snippet was some information on what looks like an as-yet unannounced product, a WiFi to 433MHz gateway module.  The schematic shows this as an ESP8266-based unit, but there’s no separate flash memory chip that I can see and the block diagram refers to an ESP8285 (shame!).  There are both transmitter and receiver sections on the 433MHz side and it appears to use an EFM8BB1 “Busy Bee” 8-bit microcontroller to interface between the 433MHz RX/TX section and the ESP UART, with what looks like a slide switch (S2 on the diagram) to disconnect the Busy Bee to allow for programming of the ESP.  The device itself receives external power via a micro-USB socket.

Depending upon the price (and ITEAD prices are usually pretty reasonable) and the range of the 433MHz components, this could be a neat little device to have around. Front and back views (photo courtesy of ITEAD) It’s not just all of those older 433MHz switch modules that have been available for years, but also the slew of devices which just transmit (doorbells, weather stations, window interlocks, etc).  There does seem to be a four device limit on the number of remote 433MHz modules supported by the stock firmware though, according to the User’s Guide.

Update – ITEAD have just sent out a “Mid-Year Carnival Sale” promotion which features this unit (with the photo above) but, bizarrely for a sale, without a price.

Update 8th Aug 2017 – The main sales page is available on ITEAD’s site now and, for a time anyway, the unit is available at an introductory price of $9.90 (down from $12.90).  There are some clarifications of the details too, with the supported device limits being shown as “up to sixteen 433MHz RF devices” or “up to four 1-4 button 433MHz RF Remotes” (so basically 16 addressable channels).

As expected, Theo isn’t far behind and Sonoff-TASMOTA has had support for the 433MHz RF Bridge incorporated since the 5.5.0 version (released on July 30th), with further updates to the code added in v5.5.1.

ITEAD Recall

Just in case you haven’t seen it already, ITEAD Studio is recalling some of their Sonoff devices.Sonoff damaged by heat

The recall covers Sonoff TH16 and Sonoff POW units, manufactured during December 2016 and January 2017, which were produced without the correct amount of tinning on the AC power traces required to carry the maximum specified current.

There doesn’t seem to be any easy way to identify affected units though and the recall Sonoff PCB damagenotice seems to infer that only Sonoffs with existing, visible damage will be exchanged.

It’s worth noting that this issue only affects units which are being used with high current loads, so it’s unlikely that you’re going to have problems if you’re only using the modules to switch on your porch lights at dusk.  However, as these units were sold specifically for their higher current handling ability over the original Sonoffs, it is probable that there are many use cases out there which will be affected by this issue.  If you’ve purchased a TH16 or POW unit recently and you’re using it with a load which draws quite a lot of current (any sort of heater, for instance), you should probably stop using it until you can verify with ITEAD Studio whether it is amongst the affected units or not.

ITEAD are asking that people who believe they have an affected TH16 or POW to open a support ticket on their site at:-  https://www.itead.cc/contact-us

How to do a Sonoff memory upgrade

Jonathan Oxer, over at SuperHouseTV, has been running a series of video episodes on the Sonoff product line recently and I really recommend his latest.  The theme of the video is Sonoff-specific hints and hint #1 is how to upgrade the memory chip in a Sonoff.  Jonathan does a great job of demonstrating how to remove the chip with nothing more than “a big, old, clunky soldering iron” and a screwdriver.  A picture is worth a thousand words, so you need to multiply that by whatever the frame rate of a YouTube video is.  Watch it!  It’s worth it.

Another Sonoff Family Member…

…and another Open Source package to run it.

I only recently noticed that ITEAD Studios have added a light switch to their Sonoff line-up.  Sonoff Touch from ITEADThe switch comes in either EU or US single-gang switch-plate sizes and has a glass front panel with a capacitive touch switch.  Inside there’s an ESP8285 module providing remote services via ITEAD’s EweLink cloud application.

There aren’t too many hardware details available on the Sonoff Touch at the moment (what sort of PSU is utilized, or even whether it’s a relay or a triac based device), but people have already started hacking it (no doubt spurred on by a statement in the comments section of the product page that this device “can’t be reprogrammed”).  David Pye seems to be first out of the gate with his (PubSubClient) MQTT implementation; not just identifying GPIO0 as the pin connected to the touch-switch, but also providing short write-ups (with photos) on how to prepare the device for programming, configuration and usage, but also providing bonus “long-touch” and “short-touch” modes in his firmware.

Note that, unsurprisingly, the Sonoff Touch requires that a neutral lead be available in the existing switch box, as well as the switched live lead.  This is something you need to check‡ before ordering a bunch of these (it’s very common for only the live lead to be available).

David’s additional switch handling looks like it might open up quite a few possibilities:-

  • Add an on-time limit for specific lights.
  • Control actual on/off based on time of day.
  • Control on/off by ambient light level (assuming you have MQTT capable sensors).
  • Put unit into OTA mode (ie:- limit reprogramming to those with physical access).
  • Use “long-press” to signal MQTT to switch all controllable lights in room on/off.
  • Additional ten-second press mode for all controllable lights in house on/off.

Seems like you could have tons of fun with this.  Nice one, David!

 

Hint – Don’t check a bathroom or toilet light switch and assume that all of the other switches in your house will be the same!

Tinkering with the Sonoff TH (by Tinkerman)

Xose Pérez has a great blog (Tinkerman.cat) with lots of hardware projects (as you’d expect from the title).  He’s also heavily into the ESP8266, so it comes as no surprise that he’s already got his hands on the latest offerings from ITead Studio, the Sonoff TH10 and TH16 high power switches.

Annotated board (bottom)Of course, it would be no fun at all if Xose just reviewed the units, but we can trust him to go a lot further than that.  In a recent article, he shows us round the interior of the units (highlighting the differences and the improvements between these new versions and the smaller original) and then demonstrates how to add i2c functionality to the existing sensor socket.  With his small modification, the Sonoff TH goes from being able to interface with either a DS18B20 (One-wire temperature sensor) or AMD2301 (DHT22 style humidity sensor) to being able to handle the whole gamut of i2c enabled input and output devices.

While we’re looking at Xose’s ESP8266 stuff, you might also like to check out his BitBucket repository.  You’ll find an alternative firmware version for the Sonoff series (named “Espurna”), which is probably where the code for the i2c mod will end up, as well as a WiFi manager library (named “JustWifi”), which features automatic AP connection based on signal strength.  There’s a ton of other, interesting stuff in there; some ESP-based and some not.  Definitely a treasure trove.