Recent Updates (Feb 14th 2019)

I’ve added Mike Rankin’s Twitter feed to the ESP32 links section (RH column).  Mike has several ESP8266 and ESP32 projects in his Github repository and usually has some interesting commentary on his Twitter feed (ongoing status, problems, fixes, etc).  His latest project, a rechargeable-coin-cell based ESP32 mini board, is definitely worth a look, as are his previous ESP8266 creations.

Theo and his merry band of helpers have been hard at work pushing out more updates to Sonoff-TASMOTA.  Along with some code refactoring at the end of January to change “boolean” types to “bool” and “byte” to “uint8_t”, some other interesting updates have just slipped out in the last couple of recent releases:-

  • Templates.  This is a great new feature which allows people to  add new device GPIO definitions via JSON templatesA repository for user-submitted templates has already been created.
  • Support for multiple ADS1115 devices on the i2c bus.  If you’ve been limited by the single AtoD pin on the ESP8266, you can now add up to four, four-channel ADS1115 devices (on unique addresses) to the i2c bus and have them automatically recognized.
  • Numeric operators “==”,  “!=” ,  “>=”  and  “<=”  added to rules (the previously existing  “=”  string comparator frequently produced unexpected results when used in a numeric context).
  • HASS discovery and status for sensors.

Martin Ger has just updated his esp_wifi_repeater package to handle MQTT QOS (in version 2.2.5).

Adding Alexa control.  Phil Bowles has released a tiny Wemo emulator library, “weenymo.  It’s about 60 lines of code and adds Alexa on/off functionality to your ESP8266 projects (and don’t forget to check out his “esparto” rapid development library while you’re visiting his GitHub repository).

Otto Winter has integrated the esphomeyaml and esphomelib projects under the umbrella name of “esphome.  If you haven’t come across either (any) of these before, the basic idea is that a user can write a short configuration file and have code automatically generated for an ESP8266 or ESP32.  With esphome, you can have an application up and running on your ESP in a few minutes without writing a single line of code yourself.

TASMOTA Update

Over the past weekend, Theo pushed out another fairly big update to TASMOTA with some interesting new additions.

  • Language file support for:-
    • Portuguese
    • Czech
    • Bulgarian
    • Russian
    • Hungarian
    • Greek
  • Addition of  “rules”, to enable local, logical control of devices based on various inputs (so, for instance, a self-contained thermostat application can now be implemented internally on the Sonoff module, without requiring support via MQTT or other external methods).
  • Addition of KNX UDP protocol support to enable integration of Sonoffs into building automation projects.
  • The re-addition of variable support for MQTT client/topic values, using the ESP chip-ID.
  • Addition of a new, optional OTA upgrade method to allow for a PlatformIO-type “push” of large binaries (up to ~700kB) without requiring the use of a local web server.
  • Addition of support for hardware and software serial bridging (text only).
  • Addition of support for the Zengge ZJ-WF017-A PWM LED strip controller (ESP12S based).
  • Addition of support for the SGP30 air quality sensor.
  • Addition of sunrise/sunset option for scheduling (by geographical location).

As well as all of these new additions, there are a whole host of fixes and updates to existing features.  Definitely worth checking this one out!