Netatalk/AFPD/TimeMachine server set-up on FreeBSD-12.1

This entry is more of a memo to myself to remind me of  what the syntax is for the /usr/local/etc/afp.conf file for FreeBSD-12.1.

I’m consolidating a couple of my servers onto one physical machine (the Beelink AP35 which I mentioned a few months back)†, using FreeBSD as the OS.  Not surprisingly, the syntax for the afpd daemon‡ set-up is very different from the ARM-Linux box which is currently running that particular service (which provides a local TimeMachine server for all of the Mac users in the family).  This is the magic incantation which worked for me:-

[Global]
login message = “AFP Service on \”herons\””
vol preset = TimeMachine
log level = default:debug
log file = /var/log/afp.log
uam list = uams_guest.so,uams_dhx.so,uams_dhx2.so
mac charset = MAC_JAPANESE
unix charset = UTF8
mimic model = Xserve
zeroconf = yes
zeroconf name = “Herons-Store”

[Herons TimeMachine]
path = /store/TimeMachine
cnid scheme = dbd
ea = ad
time machine = yes

The “log level” setting of “default:debug” is quite verbose, but really helps with debugging problems during set-up.  Once your configuration is up and running you can remove that line completely to go back to the default logging level of “default:note”.

The “Mimic model” setting tells the server which Apple device icon to display on the client machine.  Using “Xserve” shows a rack-mount server, but you can also try “TimeCapsule8,119” or “TimeCapsule6,116” to see two different versions of a TimeCapsule icon.

The “zeroconf” lines were essential (in my environment, anyway) to having the clients recognize the new server.

The “charset” lines are probably unnecessary (or at least will need local modification) for users outside of Japan.


†  The AP35 is classed as a “mini-pc” (basically a device aimed at the set-top box market, but with an Intel CPU, rather than ARM).  This model comes with a dual-core J3355 CPU and 4 x USB3 ports, making it quite a versatile little machine.

‡  Note that the current, “approved” method for implementing a non-Mac hosted TimeMachine is the Samba (SMB) suite.  However, the older netatalk method described above is still simpler and a lot lighter (in terms of the number of support packages pulled in when using “pkg install”) than Samba if you only want to implement a TimeMachine instance (as opposed to a general, network file server).

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2 thoughts on “Netatalk/AFPD/TimeMachine server set-up on FreeBSD-12.1

  1. TimeCapsule8,119! That’s what I was looking for to give the thingy a pretty icon, both in a Finder window, as in the sidebar! 🙏🏻❤️‍🩹🍀👍🏻😀

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